Manufactering Resources

Fashion Production 101
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Get the 101 on Fashion Production Basics

Tо undеrѕtаnd whаt fаѕhiоn рrоduсtiоn is, we first have to look at what the term “fashion” really means. Fаѕhiоn rеfеrѕ tо different ѕtуlеѕ or practices in сlоthing, mаkеuр, ассеѕѕоriеѕ, and еvеn furniturе. In a vеrу strict ѕеnѕе, the term оnlу rеfеrѕ tо trеndѕ in wеаrѕ or apparels; and, since we are a clothing manufacturer, we are going to limit ourselves here to the fashion production of сlоthing.

When it comes to clothing, fаѕhiоn production has come a vеrу lоng wау. The earliest clothes were likely furs and vegetation adapted into protection from the elements. Once strictly practical, clothing has since then also become an important reflection of culture, tradition, and technology. As early as the late stone age (50,000 years ago!), people invented textile production, spinning fibers into yarn and netting, looping, knitting, or weaving it to make fabric. That thread (pun intended) continues, and people clothe themselves today based on a range of textile technologies.

Thеrе wаѕ a vast improvement in fashion production during the industrial revolution, when textile development was mechanized with machines powered by waterwheels and steam engines. Production, once local and scattered across villages, moved to factory assembly lines, and sewing machines continued to streamline production. Alongside an explosion in fashion production, the 19th century also witnessed the beginning of several fashion manufacturers and brands that still exist today. That said, much of clothing production was and is still made individually by hand – but that may soon change.  

In соntеmроrаrу times, thе рrоduсtiоn оf fashion has gone global at an ever-increasing pace. Dramatic changes in transportation alongside open trade and the rise of fashion empires have made it possible to manufacture, ship, and sell clothing around the world at an incredible speed. Technological innovation continues to impact the industry, and fashion designers now have a range of synthetic fibers, manufacturing shortcuts, and ecommerce tools to add to their toolbox. The industry is bigger than ever, but it has never been easier for budding fashion designers to enter the trade with their own ready-made garments, men’s, women’s, and kid’s wears.

Fashion, not surprisingly, has become fashionable. Shows like “Project Runway” have popularized the profession and countless kids dream of becoming fashion designers. The education industry has kept pace and courses in fashion designer are now common at colleges and universities around the world. However, much like many other degrees that teach theory and critical thinking while avoiding the nitty-gritty, many new graduates come away from their degrees knowing the history of fashion like the back of their hand, but not, for example, the basics of fashion production. Let’s break it down.

Tуреѕ оf Fаѕhiоn Production

There are many reasons people choose to wear what they wear and great fashion designers know exactly for whom they are designing clothes and what needs they are meeting. In addition to the age-old need for protection, pеорlе use fаѕhiоn and clothing tо hеlр idеntifу with a certain social grоuр, ѕhоw status, and as a mеаnѕ of ѕеlf-еxрrеѕѕiоn. Mаnу реорlе rely on thеir сhоѕеn ѕtуlе оf сlоthing to share thеir реrѕоnаlitiеѕ. Fаѕhiоn varies with rеgаrdѕ to the ѕосio-economic group, occupation, status, age, region, соuntrу, religion, сulturе, and a host of other factors. Fashionable сlоthing is certain tо fall into a vаriеtу оf сlаѕѕifiсаtiоnѕ аnd categories–and this is where new fashion designers can start–inсluding:

High Fаѕhiоn

High fаѕhiоn (also rеfеrrеd tо аѕ Haute Cоuturе) is the most еxсluѕivе of clothing lines and revolves around custom-made оutfitѕ made-to-order around body type, taste, color, and specific measurements. Because of the high cost, high fashion is typically created bу fаѕhiоn designers аnd design houses that have established brands and clientele. Many оf thе materials are саrеfullу sourced to hеlр рrоvidе a more uniԛuе аnd diѕtinсtivе finiѕh. High fаѕhiоn сlоthing iѕ of соurѕе еxреnѕivе аnd this limitѕ its аvаilаbilitу in the fаѕhiоn wоrld. New fashion designers, as much as they might like, shouldn’t start with high fashion.

Rеаdу-tо-Wеаr

Thе rеаdу-tо-wеаr clothing line (аlѕо саll рrêt-а-роrtеr аnd off-the-rack) iѕ mоrе ѕtаndаrdizеd сlоthing that is pre-made аnd аvаilаblе in a vаriеtу of pre-determined ѕizеѕ. Ready-to-wear clothing designers use standard patterns, less expensive fabrics, large factory equipment, and faster construction techniques to keep costs low. Rеаdу-tо-wеаr сlоthing will not givе thе precise fit оffеrеd bу thе сuѕtоm-mаkе rаngе. Instead, it is sold in standard ѕizеѕ tо fit thе mаjоritу оf the shopping public. Petite-size and plus-size оutfitѕ аrе also available in this range, but there is сеrtаin to be lеѕѕ choice оffеrеd соmраrеd to thе ѕtаndаrd ѕizеѕ.

A selection of high-еnd off-thе-rack fаѕhiоn оutfitѕ аrе оffеrеd by ѕоmе of thе finеr fаѕhiоn hоuѕеѕ tо mаkе thе wеll-knоwn fаѕhiоn brаndѕ mоrе ассеѕѕiblе tо thе widе mаrkеtрlасе. Think Giorgio Armani’s Armani Exchange or Calvin Klein’s Jeans. This setup allows top designers to capture a larger portion of the market without sacrificing their equity, unless, as sometimes happens, quality noticeably suffers. Most new fashion designers will start with ready-to-wear because they do not have the resources to produce either couture, which requires existing high-end customers, or mass-market fashion, which requires high sales.

Mаѕѕ-Mаrkеt Fashion

Mаѕѕ-mаrkеt is a сlоthing line that iѕ сhеарlу аnd ԛuiсklу рrоduсеd in high vоlumе at thе mоrе ѕtаndаrd ѕizеѕ uѕing large mаnufасturing fасilitiеѕ. Mаѕѕ-mаrkеt clothing is оftеn known bу thе tеrm diѕроѕаblе fаѕhiоn since it iѕ usually seasonal in nаturе аnd manufactured in thе cheapest mаtеriаlѕ аvаilаblе. Mass-market fashion is thе mоѕt rеаdilу аvаilаblе fаѕhiоn сhоiсе аnd оffеrеd аt the mоѕt аffоrdаblе еnd of thе market. Think H&M, Uniqlo, and Forever 21. While these brands get access to the largest segment of the market, they typically suffer from quality–and reputation–issues. Budding fashion designers typically don’t have the cash or relationships needed to do such large manufacturing runs – the risk would simply be too high.

Clothing Manufacturer: How to select a Clothing Manufacturer
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How to Select a Clothing Manufacturer

Pairing up with a clothing manufacturer for the first time is a bit like online dating. First you offer up some information about yourself. Here’s an example of an excellent bio:

“Hi, I’m Natalie. I’m a former Olympic volleyball player. I’m creating a line for tall women like myself who get excluded by most athletic wear brands who don’t carry tall sizes. This is my first collection and I have a very limited fashion background. I do have a background in marketing and worked at a large agency for many years. I am planning to leverage many of my athlete friends’ voices to promote my brand, as well as the many media contacts I’ve accumulated over the years. My first collection will consist of 3 styles: tanks, leggings & track jackets. I’d like the tanks to retail at $45-50, the leggings at $92-98, and the track jackets at $119-127; and, based on my research, I’m aiming for manufacturing targets of $14-16, $22-27, and $29-32 respectively. I don’t want to produce more than 300 units per style for my first collection. That’s all I’m comfortable selling in the beginning.”

You may not be there yet, but this is the kind of information that’ll land you a solid first date. We’re talking:

  • A general description
  • The number of styles you’d like
  • Retail price points
  • Manufacturing price points
  • Target number of units per style

If you don’t have these, take a look at our other blog posts that’ll help you get started – and then come back here:

After you share everything about you, the next step is to make sure they know what your needs are. Sounds exactly like a date, right? Just maybe a bit more straight-forward…

“I’m looking for a manufacturer who has the time to show me the process and is okay with me being new! They won’t just take orders from me but will also give me advice on the best way to achieve price and quality targets, providing their professional opinion at each step. They are transparent with me about their operation and will give me insight into the products we are creating together. They will allow me to keep any patterns, samples, or other IP that I have paid to create. They are great communicators and do what they say they are going to do.”

Next, ask yourself, what do you need in a manufacturing partner?

Just as in the dating world where you’d want a guy who’s attractive, funny, and rich, but usually have to compromise, there are important characteristics to look for in a manufacturer. In the manufacturing world, it’s weighing between speed, price, and quality. While great manufacturers will have all three, it’s usually best to prioritize your needs and rank prospective manufacturers so your final decision will be easier.

Here are your options:

Speed: Made Here, Sold Here – Fast.

Imagine you have a big trade show, fashion event, or meeting with a buyer that is paramount to your brands success. You MUST have samples by then. Speed, then, is your choice. Or consider that you’ve just arrived from a trade show with a stack full of purchase orders (PO). Your buyers require delivery on a certain date. This means you’re under the gun and your delivery requirements must be communicated to your manufacturer upfront. Be clear about whether your manufacturing partner has the capacity and bandwidth to move at the speed you need or if they’re too busy dating other brands and can’t commit.

That said, it is wise, even without hard deadlines, to have a plan for when you’d like to launch your product. From there you can work with your manufacturer to create a timeline for production and development. Because you may not know all the processes involved (i.e. garment dye or stock fabrics?), your lead time will vary based on important decisions you make with your manufacturer. Keep communication open and chose someone who will give you time commitments for every deliverable, i.e. “Patterns will be completed by this Friday 9/15 @ 4pm.”

Quality – The American Craftsman

With thousands of fashion brands starting up each year and the many already established brands you’ll be competing against, we highly recommend that you place quality as a key priority. The best way to show a manufacturer your quality standards is to bring in samples that you absolutely love from other brands. You can show them the sewing work that you love and even which areas you think can be improved. Work with your manufacturer to understand how different sewing constructions impact your price points. Ask them to explain how they will ensure quality and what their quality control (QC) standards are. Their response will tell you a lot about how they will protect your product and you will know if they are a quality match for you.

PriceThe Commodity Play

Contrary to what the media will tell you, producing in Los Angeles is still an extremely viable move. Especially for brands that choose to sell direct to consumer, dependence on retailers who squeeze margins should be avoided. To determine your price points it’s best to start with your retail points and work backwards to understand target wholesale and manufacturing price points (See 5 steps to an apparel line budget).

Good manufacturers will ask you about your price points, and great designers will know their price points. Do not be frazzled. They ask this so that they can get you to where you need to be. By working clearly within a budget from the get-go, your manufacturer can make material, fit, and construction decisions that allow you to hit your target price points. Be clear, be honest, and, if you have a price point you need to hit no matter what, a good manufacturer will tell you one of three things. Be prepared:

  1. “NO. No possible way can you hit that price point – try Bangladesh and make sure you’re producing over 10,000 units.”
  2. “MAYBE. You could hit this price point but you’ll have to strip some things. Maybe use a less expensive fabric, do only one color screenprint and up your quantity to 500 from 300.”
  3. “YES. We can make that happen based on the information given.”

One final note on price via the old adage, you get what you pay for. I’ve been practically harassed by production teams demanding prices that can only be attained from overseas countries with very poor working conditions. These same companies complain about poor quality and bad communication while aggressively requiring prices that would put the manufacturer out of business. There is a large underground network of manufacturers exploiting their workers by paying them below minimum wage. If you go this route, you will likely not be able to establish a reputation of quality clothing and it will be much harder for you to build a sustainable, growing brand.

Now that you’ve given some detail about yourself, what you’re searching for, and what you value most in a partner, it’s time to play the field a bit and see what kinds of manufacturers are out there. What is the difference from one to the next, and how can we identify a “player” from someone looking for a long-term relationship?

Know the difference:

Sewing Contractor

This is literally just a sewing house. They do not source materials, make markers or cut fabric. They expect all materials delivered to them to be organized and they will only sew what is cut and ready to go. By working with them you’re committing to managing the other portions of production yourself.

Cut & Sew Manufacturer

This is slightly more extensive in support. These manufacturers do not source any materials and sometimes require that you provide completed markers. If you don’t know what markers are, continue below for a better fit.

Full-Package Manufacturer

Full package is the whole enchilada. These manufacturers are setup to support the entire process from procurement of materials to marking, grading, cutting, sewing, printing, finishing, folding, and packing. They are setup to support organizations that want to streamline their production and don’t have money to pay a full-time production manager running around the city overseeing all productions.

*PLAYERS – A WARNING

A traditional manufacturer, the player, is entirely focused on the end game. This can apply to any of the above, sewing contractors, cut & sew manufacturers, or full-package manufacturers, so be sure to sniff it out as soon as you can and stay away. Traditional manufacturers care only about big quantity orders and expect a purchase order (PO) prematurely – they want to take you home before buying you dinner. This is because they have experience working with larger brands who come to them with already developed products and a PO for substantial units. Here’s a conversation that I have witnessed dozens of times.

You: “Hi there! I have a collection of 6 styles that I’m looking to produce.”

Manufacturer: “Great, send me an order of 500 units and we’ll make you a sample.”

You: “Um, OK, I can’t place an order of 500 because I don’t have a sample yet. Actually, I have no tech pack, patterns, or materials either. If you can help me with these things, I will put in an order.”

Manufacturer: “You place an order and we will help you. No order, no deal.”

*CLICK*

This manufacturer clearly specializes in production only and does not have a service that supports new designers. Make sure that if you need a manufacturer that provides guidance, mentorship, and a complete service, you make it clear upfront.  

A Match Made in Heaven

After taking these steps, we’re sure that you and your manufacturer will be a match made in heaven. The key is to focus on the needs of your brand while taking into account your goals and your budget. Just like a relationship, you’ll want to end up with somebody honest and transparent who complements your strengths and weaknesses; and, just like in the real world, it’s best to go in with an understanding of what the industry looks like and all of the shady characters that you’ll want to avoid. Luckily, there are lots of great manufacturers out there. Isn’t that what your grandmother always told you?

How To Create a Clothing Line Budget in 5 Steps
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How To Create a Clothing Line Budget in 5 Steps

One of the first questions we ask our new development clients at the beginning stages of creating a clothing line is “what is your budget for the project?” Most new designers and entrepreneurs have no idea. We know that creating a budget can be overwhelming when you’re first starting out, so we decided to outline a few important budget components that we share with all of our clients.

Here are five steps for putting together a budget for your new clothing line.

1. How much can you spend in total?

It might seem elementary, but the first step to devising a budget for your project is to look at your finances and determine how much you can spend in total. Lots of new clients will say they do not have a budget, and that they are willing to spend whatever it takes to get their clothing brand up and running.

But, let’s be honest, most of us do not have an unlimited pile of cash to funnel into a new business. So sit down and take a look at your finances to see just how much money you are willing to invest in your new brand. Once you have your total budget, you can then decide where to allocate your funds and how to utilize your resources best.

2. How much do you want to spend on product development?

Once you have an overall budget, the next step is to split it up into a handful of different buckets, including product development, manufacturing, and marketing. With international production and larger orders, these buckets get more complex, but we will assume you are starting small and your clothing line will be USA-made.

As for what to budget for product development, you can use our in-house Product Development Program as a guide. For fabric sourcing, trim sourcing, pattern making, and cut and sew for your samples, clients typically spend between $1,500 to $2,000 per sample. We recommend that you devote at least $2,000 to each sample to create a quality product that will be successful in the marketplace.

3. Decide on your target price per unit for manufacturing

Once you have allocated funds to product development, calculate how much you can spend on manufacturing by focusing on the cost per unit to produce in bulk. To determine your target price per unit, start by learning the industry standard retail prices for similar products and work backward. Find out who your competitors are and what they are charging for their products. Their prices will allow you to hone in on a target retail price and get closer to how much you could reasonably make off of the sale of each unit to earn a profit. From there, you can determine the target price per unit.

4. Choose your method of distribution

How will you be selling your product? Will you be selling your clothing to stores or will you be selling on your e-commerce site? Many new businesses start out with a Shopify site to keep web development costs down, but some hire a web developer to design an e-commerce site for them. Decide how you want to sell your product and figure out how much you will need to spend to make distribution happen.

5. What is your marketing strategy?

For a startup clothing brand, we recommend allocating a significant amount of time and resources to marketing your product. Clothing moves when there’s buzz. If funds are tight, we recommend utilizing free social media marketing tools such as Hootsuite and Buffer to get started.

If you have extra budget for advertising, Facebook and Instagram ads are a great way to jumpstart your company’s social media audience and promote your brand name. Alternatively, PR is also possible with little to no budget if you are willing to come up with angles yourself and do the legwork of finding and contacting writers; and influencer marketing on Instagram is a marketing channel that many budding designers have used with success.

We hope these steps get you started on your clothing line budget. Is there something you think we should add to the list? What unexpected costs derailed your budget? Leave us a comment below with any questions or comments. We love feedback.

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American Apparel Shuts Down! Keep People Employed

As American Apparel layoffs begin, Indie Source is poised to hire

Today, American Apparel has started the mass layoffs that will leave thousands of apparel workers wondering where to turn for work. I know this because dozens of them showed up at our factory this morning looking for employment.

What can we do?

We need the U.S. fashion brands to make commitments to moving production here. These workers are extremely talented, loyal and ready to take on a new challenge.  While we can support some of the workers, there has been over 2,000 jobs lost all in one day. This requires a massive shift in the way we do business.

Today less than 3% of US fashion brands produce in the United States. If we could bump that percentage up, only slightly, all jobs could be saved. 

We’re asking U.S. fashion brands producing abroad to give LA a shot. But not just for that fuzzy feeling that will lead to more American jobs, but because we believe it’s in many U.S brands’ best interest to produce domestically.

We will perform a cost-benefit analysis using each brands’ current cost structures to show that it makes sense to produce in the U.S. financially. We’ll review the costs associated with overseas and compare them to domestic production in our factory or other Los Angeles factories.  Yes, the cost of direct labor is higher but when you consider taxes, shipping costs, holding costs and the massive cost of inventory that is discounted and thrown away, the total costs of production in China vs. Los Angeles are marginal. Tack on the tremendously skilled workforce and available fabric and trim sitting idle in Los Angeles and you’ve got a sound business case for moving some production stateside.

Don’t believe us? We’ll prove it. We’re asking US fashion brands to send us their overseas made garments and we’ll show them how to produce here while saving a ton of American jobs in the process. 

Once it is clear that Los Angeles apparel production is viable for each brand, we will create a plan for implementation and will allow each brand to see data on the workers’ they are impacting.

Contact Us Now to see if your brand can make it happen in Los Angeles.

Check out Our Sweatshop Free, Ethically Responsible Downtown LA Space Below:

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Fabric Indie Entrance Indie Source Logo OFFICE Usable

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IndieViews: Meet Emily Meaker

Our IndieViews series highlights the talented and committed people who power Indie Source.

Get to know Emily Meaker, your GO-TO point person to help you organize, plan and (finally!) get going on building your dream fashion collection.

What is your role at Indie Source?

I am a Client Coordinator at Indie Source. I work with designers who are interested in our sample development or apparel production services and help them prepare for collaboration with us.  Before we dive into things like materials sourcing, pattern making and sample making, our clients need to have the creative components figured out. They need to know what styles they wish to bring to life and have clear directions for us so we know what to develop! I help brands organize their thoughts into the language that we can understand as manufacturers. This ensures the development process runs smoothly. When you call our office line looking for help, I’m usually the one who takes your call! 🙂

 

What has your career path looked like?

I studied Music Performance and Composition in Australia and then started my first company when I was 19 called The Live Large Project, we ran events that were all about empowering people to live passionately and successfully doing what they love, I spent a lot of time doing business development for our company and we had programs running in over 40% of schools in Melbourne. I spent about four years traveling and exploring as a musician and entrepreneur and didn’t move into fashion until I happened upon Indie Source, I loved the focus and drive of the company and it was a team I really wanted to be a part of.

 

What advice would you give an aspiring fashion designer?

Educate yourself.  Many new designers don’t  understand the amount of work that goes into collection, even if a design seems simple. There are dozens of people that source, engineer, construct and manage each project to ensure the designers gets what they’ve envisioned.  Use the resources around you and pay attention to the experts you have working for you (that’s why you pay them). Our company has thrived because we have a team of people that work hard and know the industry inside out, so utilize and listen to those people. Lastly, do not begin this process without a clear idea of what you are able to invest in your development and production. It’s much smarter to have target prices and a budget for your business than to fly by the seat of your pants and finance as you go. Planning is key!

 

Why Indie Source?

I come from a business and music background, so when the opportunity to work at Indie Source came up I was excited because it’s a totally different industry than what I’ve worked in before. I’ve known Zack and Jesse for a long time and I was excited to work with a company that is so dedicated to creating jobs, growing businesses and making this industry accessible to everyone no matter where in the world you live.

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Any amazing Indie Source moments?

We’ve grown so much in the last 18 months and when we moved into our current office, we had the opportunity to throw a launch party and invite a lot of people within the industry, as well as all our clients. It was wonderful to see so many people in one space sharing and networking with each other where they otherwise might never have met, it was awesome to be part of creating that.

 

What sets Indie Source apart from other places where you’ve worked?

We are constantly striving to be as accessible to people as possible. We’ve made it easier than ever to give all the resources of the LA fashion district to everyone, no matter where in the world you are.

 

What’s the best aspect of working at Indie Source?

There is so much room for a person to grow at Indie Source and we have an amazing team! I’ve been here for over a year now and watched it grow from a few full-time office employees in a warehouse, to over 30 people in a big, beautiful showroom. Indie Source works as one unit, if something happens with a client’s project, everyone knows about it and is there for support.

 

 

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Your Kickstart to Entrepreneurship!

Amongst the many doctor and actor aspirations, lays an ambition many are not equipped to commence: creating their own business. As many start up’s disappoint before they’re fully able to thrive, a middle ground of uncertainty is present: how does a novice idea meet the demands of initial costs, provide a product worthy of consumer demands yet provide an opportunity to gain loyal customers willing to purchase at my inauguration? Enter Kickstarter, the crowd-funding platform that provides potential entrepreneurs with the opportunity to turn their dreams into reality.

There are many variables contributing to the success or deemed failure of companies; some externally or internally known while others are not. Whether or not the variables identified to the failure are presented, it’s best to reflect upon the factors contributing to success. I had the pleasure to speak with two very successful brands– one that has had recent achievement and the other still in the process of a Kickstarter triumph. Whether you’re planning the next great funded project or simply looking for inspiration from relatable businessmen, Ryan Beltran from Original Grain and Jake Joseph from Jake Joseph Underwear are idyllic.

Before investing in inventory and product development to begin any business venture, research and adequate testing are needed to determine if your product is in demand. With that said, Ryan Beltran believes “Kickstarter is a great avenue for testing products and gauging potential demand” as it develops a platform for advancing decisions to determine to continue or not. It’s also a great platform due to the audience – “an overflow of people who appreciate creativity and I wanted to reach and work with those people” reveals Jake Joseph.

As one of the most funded fashion projects to date, Original Grain fuses local wood inspiration from their Pacific Northwest hometown and modern eminence that results in a captivating timepiece. “Our primary goal when launching Original Grain (OG) was to develop a product unlike any other on the market. We wanted to create a watch that would ‘turn heads’, but was top notch in terms of its quality. That’s to be great at making our watches and provide a good experience for each and every customer we have.” With plans to solidify OG as household name and eventually expanding into a lifestyle brand, “the only way I can get there is

to focus on making a high quality product and continuously innovating our product offering.”

Original Grain

Jake Joseph elevates a traditional, hidden piece and “adds quality and workmanship to an often neglected garment”– underwear and proves that internal details and value of the first layer of adornment is equally vital. Insight to this piece was gained as this was in the process of development just as his project was launching. “We are constantly looking for ways to design products that are not just beautiful, but offer a solution too. Kickstarter is a terrific platform to introduce the The ZenSho Collective – the first underwear to never rise.” Ultimately, passion is vital Joseph believes, “be passionate about the product you want to introduce and illustrate that passion in your product and its benefits.” Genuinely understand your audience while developing an approach to providing them with a highly unique outcome, just as the exclusive underclothing of Jake Joseph has done.

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Passion coupled with an essential connection with your audience and quality product, all combine to make both of these company’s successful Kickstarter projects. “Kickstarter is an amazing community of people that want to help companies get off the ground…you just gotta go and do the dang thing.” Provide an experience for the consumer by revealing your story; when done effectively, the generated buzz will appeal to the need of your consumer now while also illustrating ideas for the future. “People love helping others achieve their goals, especially when they’re genuine” concludes Beltran. Therefore, the highly advantageous and mutually beneficial Kickstarter are highly recommended for the inner entrepreneur in all.

Original Grain: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/originalgrain/original-grain-all-natural-wood-and-stainless-stee

Jake Joseph: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/678444944/jake-joseph-redefining-mens-underwear?ref=discovery

By: Storm Tyler

***Update: Check out one of our brands NAMAKAN FUR: they just ran a successful Kickstarter campaign and we’re now in production – product to be completed January 2017

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IndieViews: Meet Johnny Quintero

Our IndieViews series highlights the talented and committed people who power Indie Source.

In our interview with Indie Source’s trim specialist Johnny Quintero, he shares his wisdom, experience, and excitement for what’s next.

What inspired you to work in fashion?

I would have to say the artistic part of fashion. I’ve always been attracted to fashion growing up. Seeing people express themselves through clothing always puts a smile on my face!

What advice would you give an aspiring fashion designer?

Do your research and think your design through to the end. Think about how your garments will be produced in production and design thoughtfully! I’ve seen so many times, designers “make it happen” or alter trim, sewing or cutting for samples and when the garment goes into production everyone scrambles to figure out how to reproduce the sample. You do not want to sell your garments one way and then in production find out you can’t do the same.

JQ2-for-webWhat has your career path looked like? 

Most of my experience has been in production. I started out as an assistant for development and production, then a production trim buyer, to domestic production manager and import coordinator. What brought me to Indie Source was the opportunity to be part of a development team again. I love working with a team to bring peoples designs to life.

What sets Indie Source apart from other places where you’ve worked?

The wonderful people here! Everyone has an entrepreneur attitude and we all work so well together. It’s a great team to be a part of.

What’s the best aspect of working at Indie Source?

The best aspect of Indie Source is meeting like minded people and always developing new and exciting garments! Every client is different and the work is always changing.

Any amazing Indie Source moments? 

Right now is the most memorable moment! We are growing the company and partnering up with so many great brands. I can’t wait to see what next year has in store for us!

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Watch Indie Source In Action On BET

Indie Source delivers for Damon Dash’s Poppington on BET’s Music Moguls.

Damon Dash’s vision for his Poppington apparel line is 100% independent and made in America using the highest quality materials and construction. On BET’s Music Moguls, Dash finds the key to his vision in Indie Source.

The BET crew captures Dash and partner Raquel M. Horn’s visit to Indie Source and meeting with Zack Hurley and Emily Meaker, where they review sketches and discuss samples. Dame’s reaction when he receives his samples from Indie Source? In a word – LOVE!

“To make something in America, at the quality and level that you like it … to me that’s real fashion,” says Dash. “With a group like Indie Source, I can make my samples, I can cut to order. I don’t have to hold a lot of inventory, because inventory’s what kills you in the fashion business.”

As a company that was created to help support independent designers, Indie Source is excited to be manufacturing Dame Dash’s vision for Poppington. We help designers like Dash develop their initial product. They bring us their sketches and we make modifications, source the fabric, and put together a collection for them. Once they’re happy with samples, we take them into production. And we manufacture it all here in Los Angeles. Indie Source is transforming the fashion industry in LA and making dreams into reality for indie designers.

Check us out in the Music Moguls episode below and find out more about what Indie Source has to offer independent fashion designers.

https://youtu.be/J2zSE6jDnrI?t=13m50s

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Blue Jean Baby – Looks Like Magic

Indie Source’s sneak peek at Blue Jean Baby’s stunning look book photos!

In our April interview with Lola Rogers of Blue Jean Baby, we learned about the inspiration behind her clothing and the exciting journey of developing and producing her line with Indie Source. A lot has happened in the past couple months – Blue Jean Baby is now in the process of launching its website and taking pre-sale orders. In this post, Indie Source is thrilled to share previews from Blue Jean Baby’s fantastic look book shoot!

Shot by photographer Alan Gwizdowski at Chianti Life, a romantic bed and breakfast in a lush Topanga Canyon wonderland, the photos feature the gorgeous Cristal Serrano modeling Blue Jean Baby’s ivory silk and curated vintage clothing, along with vintage and new handmade Native American jewelry. An amazing styling team — hair by Tanja Tomicic and makeup by Josiah Craft  — made everything look like magic.

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American Apparel Crowdsourcing New Products

Los Angeles-based fashion company launches crowdsourcing campaign to discover new product ideas.

As one of the largest apparel manufacturers in North America, American Apparel has made its mark on the fashion industry with its anti-sweatshop values, entirely made-in-USA manufacturing, and controversial ad campaigns. The company’s new “Made In” crowdsourcing campaign calls for vendor submissions of new American-made accessories to be sold in its retail stores and online.

American Apparel crowdsourcing“Made In” is seeking submissions of leather goods, canvas goods, footwear, jewelry, paper goods, fragrances, and small home furnishings. Products must be made in the USA, priced at $100 or less, and vendors must be able to ship 500 units in a 30-day period. Vendors may submit their products for consideration by uploading an up to 60-second video to American Apparel’s website. Submissions are due June 17.

American Apparel opened its downtown Los Angeles factory in 2000, a seven-story 800,000-square-foot facility where it produces more than 55,000 products. The company has seen major highs and lows, from being on Inc.’s 2005 list of the 500 fastest-growing U.S. companies, to ousting its controversial founder and CEO Dov Charney in 2014, and filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2015. American Apparel is faced with turning around a company challenged by financial losses and leadership upheaval, and its “Made In” crowdsourcing campaign is an effort to revitalize its offerings while supporting small US accessory manufacturing projects.

While American Apparel must cut costs as part of its turnaround strategy — according to the Los Angeles Times, experts say the company may eventually move all of its manufacturing to another U.S. region where production costs are less — the company continues its commitment to American apparel manufacturing. Senior vice president of marketing Cynthia Erland says, “We want to continue to support manufacturing in the U.S. by giving small businesses the opportunity to thrive and succeed.”

 

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